Japan vs South Africa Reddit

Japan vs South Africa Reddit : Rugby World Cup power rankings: breaking down all 20 teams in Japan
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There has been a lot of talk about high tackles this tournament. I’ve also talked incessantly over the past few years about the abhorrence the breakdown has become. Scotland lost one of their own, Hamish Watson, as a result of one of those careless and illegal clear‑outs in the pool matches and he was missed last weekend.

In Yokohama there were hardly any high shots and very few horizontal Japanese players off their feet at rucks. Why? Because of their alignment in their structures and their application to working hard at their basics. If you are collectively quick of thought, and clearly know your roles, you can react quicker, better and more skilfully. Watch the Japanese first phase – they were so good that they didn’t need to use blunt force to clear a defender because they got to the ruck so quickly and the ball was gone so rapidly.

Also expect the South Africans to put boot to ball a lot; the Japanese wingers are electric but what are they like fielding a high ball with several South Africans steaming after them?

Pace versus power
The intentions of South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus are evident in the fact he’s named six forwards on the bench, including two second-rows.

“If you’ve watched the way we’ve played through the World Cup, you will see the way we are going to play,” said South Africa assistant coach Matthew Proudfoot.

The World Cup hosts have already surpassed expectations by topping Pool A, notching up wins over Six Nations giants Ireland and Scotland, as well as Samoa and Russia.

Now the Japanese public want more, and are easily reminded of the Brave Blossoms’ pool victory over the Springboks at the 2015 World Cup, one of the sport’s biggest ever upsets.

“No we won’t be drawing on that at all,” was Japan coach Jamie Joseph’s blunt assessment when asked whether that win four years ago, when just four of today’s side started, was a motivating factor for the match at Tokyo Stadium.

Rugby World Cup quarter-final: Japan v South Africa
Venue: Tokyo Stadium Date: Sunday, 20 October Kick-off: 11:15 BST

While the Springboks have picked a powerful pack and six forward replacements, Joseph believes his team’s tactics are not so obvious.

“It is clear what South Africa are going to do,” he said.

“What is not so clear is what we are going to do; that is what I am looking forward to.”

No longer a miracle: How Japan became a rugby force
Are tier-two nations closing the gap?
Kolbe fit and Marx benched for Springboks
Ryohei Yamanaka’s inclusion at full-back in place of William Tupou is the only change to the starting XV that beat Scotland in their final Pool A game last weekend.

Japan vs Springboks Reddit

Japan vs Springboks Reddit : The breathtaking match between the hosts Japan and Gregor Townsend’s Scotland was effectively a knockout game with a little bit more bite. Held in the wake of a devastating typhoon, it brought a brief respite as Japan’s fans cheered and cried and coerced their beloved Brave Blossoms to a victory borne on raw emotion and bottled-up energy.

The speed of ball and movement generated in attack by Jamie Joseph’s side was a joy to behold. It negated any need to throw bodies at breakdowns and kept players on their feet and in the game.

With speed sometimes comes a lack in accuracy. Not with this Japan team. Their play was as precise as it was pacy. Passes went to hand, the players ran into space, the point of attack was changed to slow any momentum Scotland’s defensive line speed could generate. The fundamentals were sturdy and were respected.

Rugby World Cup power rankings: breaking down all 20 teams in Japan
Read more
There has been a lot of talk about high tackles this tournament. I’ve also talked incessantly over the past few years about the abhorrence the breakdown has become. Scotland lost one of their own, Hamish Watson, as a result of one of those careless and illegal clear‑outs in the pool matches and he was missed last weekend.

In Yokohama there were hardly any high shots and very few horizontal Japanese players off their feet at rucks. Why? Because of their alignment in their structures and their application to working hard at their basics. If you are collectively quick of thought, and clearly know your roles, you can react quicker, better and more skilfully. Watch the Japanese first phase – they were so good that they didn’t need to use blunt force to clear a defender because they got to the ruck so quickly and the ball was gone so rapidly.

This Japan team show us the blueprint of what is possible and that the laws do not need to be ignored to play the modern game. Alain Rolland and World Rugby take note. Stop allowing sloppy technique. You’ve clamped down on the high tackle; now, after this World Cup, do the same for the breakdown. It will lead to smarter training across the game as technique and speed is honed, not heavy weights harnessed and hits heightened.

The question now is can the first Asian side to make the knockout stage go any further when they face the very good South Africans, who beat them in Tokyo 41-7 in their last warm-up game, and are a team many class as one of the favourites to win the whole thing.

Japan vs Springboks Live

Japan vs Springboks Live : Two weeks ago, Springboks coach Rassie Erasmus described it as a “scary” prospect. It got a whole lot scarier this week.

South Africa is now in Japan’s way at the Rugby World Cup and the two-time champion will have to be at its strongest and at its sharpest to avoid becoming another one swept aside by an exhilarated home team and host nation in the quarterfinals this weekend.

Rankings mean nothing. Ask Ireland, rugby’s top-ranked team coming into the World Cup and then run off its feet by Japan in a shocking upset in Shizuoka.

Previous records mean zero, too. Ask Scotland, which had beaten Japan in seven out of seven previous tests and led the Japanese early in the last game of the pool-stage before having the carpet yanked out from under their feet in Yokohama on Sunday.

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Japan is in the quarterfinals for the first time and the scene may never be better set for such an outsider to threaten the Rugby World Cup final. Beat South Africa, as Japan has done before at the World Cup, and then it’s Wales or France for a place in the final. Seems outlandish, but tell Japan that after all that’s happened.

If the Springboks and Erasmus didn’t see it coming, it’s not because they haven’t been warned.

They were asked countless times through their pool-stage games what they thought of the possibility of playing Japan in the quarters. For the most part, they answered in typically cautious fashion: It’s not decided. It could still be Ireland or Scotland. We haven’t thought that far ahead.

The one moment Erasmus did let his guard down was on the day Japan upset Ireland. The Springboks were playing Namibia in Toyota City and Erasmus was late for his team’s on-field warmup. He was watching Japan and Ireland do battle on TV somewhere in the stadium and he couldn’t take his eyes off it.

It was then that Erasmus conceded playing Japan was “a realistic option. And also a scary option.”

The Springboks have two memories of Japan in test rugby and they couldn’t be further apart. There’s the so-called Miracle of Brighton, when the Japanese left rugby flabbergasted by beating the Springboks at the 2015 World Cup.

But what of the most recent meeting? Three weeks before Japan stunned the World Cup again to beat Ireland, it played South Africa in a World Cup warmup game in Kumagaya. The Springboks won 41-7 and the Japanese seemed meek. They were nothing like the ferocious, non-stop force they were against Ireland and Scotland

Japan vs Springboks

Japan vs Springboks : Joseph said his players’ confidence at the tournament has grown so much through their four successive wins – including victories over Scotland and Ireland – that he has had less to do as they prepare for the last eight.

“The players have really taken over,” he said. “It is a really good sign as a coach when you feel a little redundant because you know there is real belief in your team.”

Coverage: Live commentary on BBC Radio 5 Live and online with text updates on the BBC Sport website and app.
Coach Jamie Joseph says Japan will have the element of surprise against South Africa after he named his side for Sunday’s Rugby World Cup quarter-final.

Rugby World Cup quarter-final: Japan v South Africa
Venue: Tokyo Stadium Date: Sunday, 20 October Kick-off: 11:15 BST

While the Springboks have picked a powerful pack and six forward replacements, Joseph believes his team’s tactics are not so obvious.

“It is clear what South Africa are going to do,” he said.

“What is not so clear is what we are going to do; that is what I am looking forward to.”

No longer a miracle: How Japan became a rugby force
Are tier-two nations closing the gap?
Kolbe fit and Marx benched for Springboks
Ryohei Yamanaka’s inclusion at full-back in place of William Tupou is the only change to the starting XV that beat Scotland in their final Pool A game last weekend.

Wing Kotaro Matsushima, hooker Shota Horie, second row Luke Thompson, prop Keita Inagaki, fly-half Yu Tamura and captain Michael Leitch were all part of the squad that famously upset South Africa in the teams’ pool-stage meeting in Brighton four years ago.

Japan: Yamanaka; Matsushima, Lafaele, Nakamura, Fukuoka; Tamura, Nagare; Inagaki, Horie, Koo, Thompson, Moore, Leitch (c), Labuschagne, Himeno.

Replacements: Sakate, Nakajima, Ai Valu, Van der Walt, Lelei Mafi, Tanaka, Matsuda, Lava LemekiThis will be the third time Japan and South Africa have met in Test rugby, Japan beating the Springboks 34-32 at the 2015 World Cup before South Africa secured a comfortable 41-7 victory in a warm-up game for this World Cup
Japan’s victory over South Africa in 2015 was their first against a tier-one nation in the tournament at their 16th attempt, they have won two of their three such games since (v Ireland and Scotland in 2019).
Japan have won six consecutive Rugby World Cup matches, only Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and England have enjoyed longer winning runs in the tournament
South Africa scored more tries (27) and points (185) than any other side in the pool stages, their tally of 27 tries is more than double the amount Japan scored (13)

Japan vs Springboks Reddit

Japan vs Springboks Reddit : Japan’s “unique” brand of high-tempo attacking rugby will face the acid test when it runs up against the blitz defence of a tough South Africa side in Sunday’s World Cup quarter-final.

The World Cup hosts have already surpassed expectations by topping Pool A, notching up wins over Six Nations giants Ireland and Scotland, as well as Samoa and Russia.

Now the Japanese public want more, and are easily reminded of the Brave Blossoms’ pool victory over the Springboks at the 2015 World Cup, one of the sport’s biggest ever upsets.

“No we won’t be drawing on that at all,” was Japan coach Jamie Joseph’s blunt assessment when asked whether that win four years ago, when just four of today’s side started, was a motivating factor for the match at Tokyo Stadium.

“In fact, I’ve been trying to forget about it for the last four years. Everyone talked about it, but we’re a different team, different players.”

Current England coach Eddie Jones was in charge of Japan at the last World Cup before ex-All Black Joseph took over. He has instilled a huge self-belief and a simple game plan based around ball retention, exploiting the short side and explosive, running rugby.

It is a pleasure to behold, and Japan’s four tries in their final pool victory over Scotland came in a purple patch that represented the most entertaining segment of rugby played so far at the tournament.

The performance was widely praised and drew many admirers, with former England scrum-half Matt Dawson saying Japan were playing a “unique” brand of rugby.

Teams

South Africa (15-1)

Willie le Roux; Cheslin Kolbe, Lukhanyo Am, Damian de Allende, Makazole Mapimpi; Handre Pollard, Faf de Klerk; Duane Vermeulen, Pieter-Steph du Toit, Siya Kolisi (capt); Lood de Jager, Eben Etzebeth; Frans Malherbe, Bongi Mbonambi, Tendai Mtawarira

Replacements: Malcolm Marx, Steven Kitshoff, Vincent Koch, RG Snyman, Franco Mostert, Francois Louw, Herschel Jantjies, Francois Steyn.

Japan (15-1)

Ryohei Yamanaka; Kotaro Matsushima, Timothy Lafaele, Ryoto Nakamura, Kenki Fukuoka; Yu Tamura, Yutaka Nagare; Kazuki Himeno, Pieter Labuschagne, Michael Leitch (capt); James Moore, Luke Thompson; Koo Ji-won, Shota Horie, Keita Inagaki

Replacements: Atsushi Sakate, Isileli Nakajima, Asaeli Ai Valu, Wimpie van der Walt, Amanaki Lelei Mafi, Fumiaki Tanaka, Rikiya Matsuda, Lomano Lava Lemeki

Japan vs Springboks Live

Japan vs Springboks Live : The last time the Springboks met Japan in a Rugby World Cup encounter it didn’t go to plan. In fact, Japan pulled off what must rank as one of the biggest upsets in World Rugby as they claimed a historic win in Brighton.

The hosts for this tournament have already made history at this renewal, becoming the first Asian side to reach the knockout stages and they go in search of history once more against the Springboks in Tokyo on Sunday.

Japan are 5/1 against the 1/6 offered on the Springboks as far as the Full Time Result is concerned.

There is perhaps reason to dream for the Japanese. They managed to pull off a brilliant win over Ireland in the pool stages and they put on another brave performance to see off Scotland and ensure their progression to the knockouts. They’ve also got a huge wave of home support behind them.

But is it enough to see off the Springboks? The short answer is, probably not.

The Springboks have ticked all the necessary boxes so far at the competition. While they lost to New Zealand in their opening encounter, for the first half an hour of the contest they showed all the necessary attributes that have many thinking they might go all the way.

The Winning Margin has South Africa Over 12.5 at 7/10 and South Africa Under 12.5 at 19/10 while Japan Under 12.5 is at 6/1 and Japan Over 12.5 is at 18/1.

The Alternative Winning Margin sees 5/2 offered on South Africa 11-20, 28/10 on South Africa 1-10 and 7/2 on South Africa 21-30. There is 6/1 on South Africa 31-40 and 7/1 on Japan 1-10.

The Springboks recorded a commanding 41-7 win over Japan in their final tune-up game ahead of the Rugby World Cup, running in six tries in Kumagaya. While that game lacked the intensity of a World Cup knockout game it would be enough to suggest that the Springboks will have too many guns for the Brave Blossoms.

The Winning Margin Spread has South Africa 11-15 and South Africa 16-20 at 5/1 with 11/2 on offer on South Africa 6-10 and South Africa 21-25.

It’s quite clear that Japan’s rugby hopes are on an upward curve. They showed glimpses of what might be with a historic win in 2015 and they have been brilliant to ensure that they topped their pool in the latest renewal. One does, however, get the impression that this might be as far as they get in the 2019 edition.

The Springboks have a fantastic opportunity to ensure their progression in what seems to be the safer of the options available as far as quarter-final competitors go.

For a full range of betting options available on this quarter-final clash between South Africa and Japan then click here.

Japan vs Springboks

Japan vs Springboks : Michael Leitch still isn’t satisfied, even after his Japan squad qualified for the Rugby World Cup quarterfinals for the first time.
Leitch will line up against South Africa on Sunday four years after being part of the team that produced the most shocking upset in the tournament’s history with a victory over the Springboks.

The so-called Miracle of Brighton, he says, is history.

Topping Pool A with wins over Ireland, Scotland, Samoa and Russia this time achieved the pre-tournament goal of reaching the knockout stages on home soil.

“This is not the end of the story,” Leitch told a packed news conference on Friday in downtown Tokyo.

“We’re not satisfied.

“The match we had four years ago, the world started to focus on the Japan rugby team — surprised — and the fans of Japan were struck with how we played.

“We’ve got the chance to do it live in front of the Japanese people again.”

Japan capped the pool stage with a 28-21 win over Scotland in Yokohama last Sunday night, and only made one injury enforced change to its line-up to face South Africa after fullback William Tupou failed a head injury assessment and was ruled out of selection.

Ryohei Yamanaka moved from the bench to fullback in a direct replacement for Tupou.

There’s eight players in the Japan squad who were involved in the upset over South Africa four years ago, with Leitch, Kotaro Matsushima, Shota Horie and Luke Thompson in the starting line-up again.

Keita Inagaki and Yu Tamura started on the bench four years ago but are in the starting line-up for the game at Tokyo Stadium. Fumiaki Tanaka and Amanaki Lelei Mafi are again on the bench.

JAPAN: Ryohei Yamanaka, Kotaro Matsushima, Timothy Lafaele, Ryoto Nakamura, Kenki Fukuoka, Yu Tamura, Yutaka Nagare; Kazuki Himeno, Pieter Labuschagne, Michael Leitch (c), James Moore, Luke Thompson, Jiwon Koo, Shota Horie, Keita Inagaki

Reserves: Atsushi Sakate, Isileli Nakajima, Asaeli Ai Valu, Wimpie van der Walt, Amanaki Lelei Mafi, Fumiaki Tanaka, Rikiya Matsuda, Lomano Lava Lemeki

Japan vs South Africa Live

Japan vs South Africa Live : But for all the attacking potency provided by Kolbe, it’s up front where South Africa will look to crush the life out of Japan.

The hosts will have to be at their top of their game just to achieve parity in the line-out and scrum, and the Springboks will launch their massive ball-carriers at the heart of the Japanese to suck in defenders before creating the space for Kolbe out wide.

Also expect the South Africans to put boot to ball a lot; the Japanese wingers are electric but what are they like fielding a high ball with several South Africans steaming after them?

Pace versus power
The intentions of South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus are evident in the fact he’s named six forwards on the bench, including two second-rows.

“If you’ve watched the way we’ve played through the World Cup, you will see the way we are going to play,” said South Africa assistant coach Matthew Proudfoot.

Asked if it’s going to be a one-dimensional approach, Proudfoot promised an “exciting Test match”, which if you’re a South African probably means suffocating the Japanese at the set-piece.

All fired up
Japan’s only change to the team that beat Scotland last weekend is the return at full-back of Ryohei Yamanaka in place of William Tupou.

“We’ve achieved the last eight but what we do from here is also important,” said No.8 Kazuki Himeno. He added that the Brave Blossoms are “all fired up for the South Africa game”.

“Japan stunned, literally shocked, South Africa 34-32 in the 2015 World Cup, and they’ll be looking to do more of the same this time around. The hosts have already topped pool A against the odds after upsetting Ireland 19-12 earlier in the tournament. If anyone doubted the ability of this Japan side, their commanding performance against Scotland was enough to make people take notice. South Africa are the better side and should run out comfortable winners and will arrive as favourites – but maybe that’s where Japan are at their most dangerous.”

This will be Japan’s first Rugby World Cup quarter-final, so you have to back South Africa with all their big-game experience. Japan should be kept in it for a long way by their strong home support, but I would expect the Springboks to ease out to a ten-point win by full-time.”

Japan vs South Africa Reddit

Japan vs South Africa Reddit : In a country where big is usually considered better, the 5ft 8in and 13-stone Kolbe is sinewy speed and grace, not too dissimilar from the Japanese wingers, Kotaro Matsushima and Kenki Fukuoka, who between them have scored nine of their team’s 13 tries in the World Cup.
A film has been made about the last time South Africa and Japan met at the Rugby World Cup.

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Japan vs. South Africa
What: Rugby World Cup quarter-final
When: Sunday 20 October
Where: Tokyo Stadium, Tokyo
UK start time: 11.15am
TV coverage: live on ITV

The Brighton Miracle tells the story of that incredible day in 2015 when the two-time world champions were stunned by the Brave Blossoms in rugby union’s biggest ever upset.

Four years later, can it happen again when they clash in the quarter-final on Sunday at the Tokyo Stadium?

Given the way that the Japanese beat Ireland and Scotland in the pool stage, playing with pace and precision and relentless energy, the answer is “yes”, but only a fool would write off the South Africans.

Forewarned is forearmed and all that. Plus, the Springboks are out for revenge.

“We know that it’s happened, it’s four years later, it’s a new opportunity for us,” said Springbok winger Cheslin Kolbe. “We’ll make sure we’re really well prepared and just implement what the coaches want from us and not have what happened in 2015 at the back of our heads.”

Kolbe came up against Fukuoka – a player he describes as “really powerful and explosive” – when South Africa beat Japan in the bronze medal match in the 2016 Rio Olympics rugby sevens, and the pair are similar not just in terms of pace but the pleasure they take in their rugby.

“I enjoy running with the ball in hand and whenever I do get opportunities, I’ll make sure I keep on having fun,” said Kolbe.

Japan vs South Africa Live

Japan vs South Africa Live : South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus has revealed playing a World Cup warm-up fixture against Japan (won by the Boks 41-7 in Kumagaya) had been a deliberate ploy in order to dampen down any talk of the Brighton Miracle if they met during the tournament:

“In all honesty, the reason for that warm-up game was to erase the Brighton game, so that if we do play them in play-off games, that game hopefully doesn’t get mentioned again.

“It’s 1-1, and now we go into a quarter-final game against a really tough team. That (Brighton) game is in the past now.

“I must say that in that warm-up game, there was no pressure.

“We definitely won’t be able to go with the same plan that we went into the warm-up game with (and) we will definitely have to come up with a totally new plan.

“It will probably be something where we will have to match their pace and speed, and try to keep up with the way they play the game.”

Japan captain Michael Leitch has said the potential for his side to grow is “scary” and that while the World Cup knockout stage will be a step into the unknown, they have the mental strength to deal with the pressure:

“Looking back, even since 2011, this team has grown so much and it is scary to think about how far this team could actually grow.

“The last four games, we are getting better each time, and the confidence is growing. This is great for Japanese rugby, for rugby in Asia and for tier-two rugby.

“First we have qualified for the quarter-finals and now we are shuffling the goalposts (of what can be expected).

“The biggest reason is belief, that is the trigger. Since 2011, the opponents we have played have been stronger and stronger. We have played more tier-one nations and played in Super Rugby.”

Japan have made one injury-enforced change to their starting line-up, bringing Ryohei Yamanaka in at full-back in place of William Tupou.

Tupou suffered a concussion in Japan’s win over Scotland at Yokohama last weekend and drops out of the matchday 23 altogether, with livewire winger Lomano Lava Lemeki named among the replacements as cover for the back three

South Africa’s Cheslin Kolbe has returned from an ankle injury. Kolbe scored twice against Italy but picked up an injury and was kept out of the Springboks’ final Pool B match against Canada as a precaution to ensure he was ready for the quarters.

Coach Rassie Erasmus had rotated his squad through the pool stage to ensure his players all had game time before the knockout stage but has settled on the same matchday squad that played against Italy, with a 6-2 split between forwards and backs in the replacements.